Crochet, knitting, astronomy & life in general.

Sunday, February 22, 2009

Breadmaker bread and naan bread

When my grandmother moved out of her house and into a retirement home, I inherited all sorts of useful things from her house, among them a breadmaker. For the last five months or so, I've been too lazy to even crack the recipe book open. However, yesterday, in a fit of productivity, I finally got around to making my first loaf. I followed the instructions with extra-special care, and started the machine up. Two and a half hours later, I looked through the little glass window at the top of the machine, and this is what I saw:



Oh no! The bread was trying to escape! I must have put too much flour. I had thought that my measurements had been meticulous, but then my boyfriend informed me that our measuring cup is slightly larger than a standard cup. I'll have to remember that for next time. Despite the largeness of the loaf and its funny top, it came out well, and tastes delicious.





While the bread maker was doing its thing, I thought I should get doubly productive and make some naan bread as well. I found this recipe online, and since it got such a high rating (who can argue with "This recipe makes the best naan I have tasted outside of an Indian restaurant."), I decided to give it a try. The only change I made to the recipe was to use olive oil instead of butter.



They turned out super well, just like the naan I've had in indian restaurants. The recipe really makes a lot too. I was left with over 20 naan breads, which should last me a little while. For anyone who wants to repeat this recipe, a few words of advice. I used a non-stick frying pan instead of a grill, and I found that it was easier to brush oil onto the rolled-out dough before putting it onto the pan and then buttering the other side once it started to puff up. Also, the thinner the dough, the more bubbles appeared. Finally, if using a frying pan, like I did, the heat should go no higher than medium or the naan will get burnt.